Motivation following bad grades

Many children and parents worry about the semi-annual reports. While the grades in one subject are good, other weaknesses are noticeable. Many children react by rejecting the subject ("I don't like maths!") or the teacher ("He doesn't like me anyway!").

But it is often only learning gaps or difficulties in understanding that have led to the poor performance. These can be made up for quickly with a little learning discipline.

But how do you motivate your child to stay tuned to improve their performance?

It is very important to realise that the half-yearly reports are only an orientation aid for parents, learners and teachers. A lot can still change before the next report, especially if the teachers see that the child is motivated and willing to commit itself.

In principle, it makes sense to first analyse why the poor grades were achieved. Possible reasons for this are: Possible reasons for this are:

  • Overstraining
  • Underchallenge
  • Lack of interest
  • Issues with a teacher
  • Exam anxiety
  • Lack of self-confidence in a subject
  • Bullying at school
  • Truancy
  • Family problems

Discuss the possible reasons for each problematic subject individually and in peace. After the analysis of the problem, specifically deal with the problems and insecurities of your child and, together with him, consider how these problems can be overcome. It helps to develop rules and principles together. Conclude a "contract" with your child in which both obligations and rights are clearly formulated for both sides.

Important: This contract must be drawn up jointly by you and your child. Both sides sign and thus show that they agree with the agreements concluded. Both the children and the parents must abide by these rules.

As soon as your child realises that it can actually be successful in school by adhering to (learning) rules and a certain discipline, the motivation will also increase again in the "unloved" subjects..

If it turns out that gaps in learning cause the lack of motivation, it makes sense to intervene in good time through tutoring. This way, these gaps can be closed quickly and both motivation and self-confidence can be restored in the subjects concerned.